Richard Feynman

Richard Feynman

American physicist
11 May 1918 — 15 February 1988

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Physics isn`t the most important thing. Love is.

In order to make progress, one must leave the door to the unknown ajar.

We are trying to prove ourselves wrong as quickly as possible, because only in that way can we find progress.

I learned very early the difference between knowing the name of something and knowing something.

It doesn`t seem to me that this fantastically marvelous universe, this tremendous range of time and space and different kinds of animals, and all the different planets, and all these atoms with all their motions, and so on, all this complicated thing can merely be a stage so that God can watch human beings struggle for good and evil - which is the view that religion has. The stage is too big for the drama.

I think it`s much more interesting to live not knowing than to have answers which might be wrong.

Science is what we have learned about how to keep from fooling ourselves.

Scientific knowledge is an enabling power to do either good or bad - but it does not carry instructions on how to use it.

I can live with doubt, and uncertainty, and not knowing. I think it's much more interesting to live not knowing than to have answers which might be wrong.

The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool.

To those who do not know mathematics it is difficult to get across a real feeling as to the beauty, the deepest beauty, of nature.

I think I can safely say that nobody understands quantum mechanics.

Learn from science that you must doubt the experts. As a matter of fact, I can also define science another way: Science is the belief in the ignorance of experts.

We cannot define anything precisely! If we attempt to, we get into that paralysis of thought that comes to philosophers, who sit opposite each other, one saying to the other "You don't know what you are talking about!" The second one says "What do you mean by know? What do you mean by talking? What do you mean by you?", and so on.

Poets say science takes away from the beauty of the stars - mere globs of gas atoms. Nothing is "mere." I too can see the stars on a desert night, and feel them. But do I see less or more? The vastness of the heavens stretches my imagination - stuck on this carousel my little eye can catch one-million-year-old light. A vast pattern - of which I am a part - perhaps my stuff was belched from some forgotten star, as one is belching there. Or see them with the greater eye of Palomar, rushing all apart from some common starting point when they were perhaps all together. What is the pattern, or the meaning, or the why? It does not do harm to the mystery to know a little about it. For far more marvelous is the truth than any artists of the past imagined!

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